t

Porthmeor Beach

In instagram on December 20, 2014

t

Year 5

Flickr Pics 18th December 2014

on December 18, 2014 by kirsty

Leave a Comment

t

Someone got up too late and had to go to school in their pyjamas…

In instagram on December 15, 2014

t

Christmas Trombones With Added Hats

In instagram on December 14, 2014

t

Christmas Trombones

In instagram on December 14, 2014

The Children Act

The Children Act by Ian McEwan

In books read on December 1, 2014

I suspect that when Ian McEwan gets up and scribbles his to-do list on the back of an envelope it is probably a literary masterpiece. This is the second of two books I've read in a row that have made me question why I read fiction. This is a scrap of a story is wrapped around a whole load of details concerning a few court cases mostly to do with the religious beliefs of parents and what they mean for their children when they fall outside those we consider to be normal. This time I felt that I would perhaps rather have read about the real life cases that inspired McEwan to write the book rather than these fictionalised accounts. And I got a bit annoyed at seeing Sally Clark's downfall condensed into a quick anecdote.

In the end though I loved McEwan's scrap of a story, fabulously told and with all the emotions pitch-perfect. Though I'd rather he wrote something else, I'm not going to stop reading or enjoying this kind of book from him anytime soon.

This was a kindle eBook.

The Soul of Discretion (Simon Serrailler, #8)

The Soul of Discretion (Simon Serrailler, #8) by Susan Hill

In books read on November 28, 2014

The first of two books in a row that have made me question why on earth I read fiction anyway. For entertainment mostly obviously. I found myself putting this book down when (spoiler, but not a book-busting major one) the lead character needs to get inside the character of a child-abuser. I picked the book up again and obviously the author no more wants to tell me about the details than I want to read about them, so it wasn't an horrendous experience to read after all. And there was entertainment and information and elucidation. I wouldn't have wanted to have read a non-fiction book with a child abuse (maybe that is shortsighted of me too), and I did get something out of reading a fictional one. There are two storylines in this book that get home the point that people capable of evil don't come with big pointers labelling them as such (and Ben Goldacre said something very similar when leaving a piece concerning a Rolf Harris song in his book I Think You'll Find it's a Bit More Complicated Than That I read recently).

The book itself was pretty decent. I like the ongoing family saga thing that is going on in the background behind the detective stories, and, in the end, I like the fact that Susan Hill isn't afraid of putting some pretty thought provoking stuff into these books.

This was a kindle eBook.

A Breach of Security

A Breach of Security by Susan Hill

In books read on November 20, 2014

I picked this ebook up thinking it was the new Simon Serrailler book. It is a Simon Serrailler book that I hadn't read but it's just a short one, somewhere between a short story and a novella. Oddly it seems to take place after The Soul of Discretion which is the book I was after (maybe not odd - it was published later, it's just that Goodreads has this down as before it in the series). It packs a lot in but as usual with short stories I end up wishing the author had padded it out to develop some of the characters further, everything seems a bit too rushed in this format.

This was a kindle eBook.

I Think You'll Find it's a Bit More Complicated Than That

I Think You’ll Find it’s a Bit More Complicated Than That by Ben Goldacre

In books read on November 20, 2014

I was a bit disappointed to see that Ben Goldacre's new book was just a collection of his mostly previously published writing - the majority of the book is made up of his Bad Science columns from the Guardian, and you can read a lot of that on his website (which I would recommend as a way to while away an idle afternoon). I was really hoping to see Goldacre get his teeth into subjects a bit more than he gets the chance to do in the length of a newspaper column.

The curious thing is that the short pieces of writing become one of those "greater than the sum of its parts" things: you get to see in ten minutes of reading how the same subjects have been revisited over several years of writing; and although you mostly have to join the dots yourself it turns out to be a very worthwhile read. Occasionally Goldacre adds footnotes - mostly these are where someone has told him that he needs to wait a year or five for some results to be published and the footnote points out that a year or ten has now passed without that happening (big surprise all round...). I've certainly read a fair chunk of this book before so I was surprised to enjoy reading it again quite so much. Despite being a bit of a doorstop it's a book that you can read in three minute chunks, though the short articles reel you in with that "just one more" thing and you suddenly find you've burnt tonight's tea.

Definitely looking forward to his next book.

This was a paperback.

Death of an Avid Reader (Kate Shackleton, #6)

Death of an Avid Reader (Kate Shackleton, #6) by Frances Brody

In books read on November 20, 2014

I've enjoyed the previous books in this series so I was a bit disappointed to walk into Waterstones in Huddersfield a few weeks ago and find a big sign telling me that Frances Brody was coming to sign books... I was disappointed because the time on the sign ended about an hour before I had arrived. Happily as my brain was still processing this a little lady popped up beside me who turned out to be Frances Brody - still there and happy to sign a book for me. Thanks!

I liked this too - it's set mostly in the middle of Leeds which will have me wandering round looking for the right buildings next time I am in the city centre, it's 1920-something and Kate's searching for the adopted daughter of a lady and getting tangled up in a murder at the Leeds Library. Nicely plotted as usual and lighthearted without being too lightweight. Good entertainment.

This was a paperback.