Crossbones Yard by Kate Rhodes

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Interesting crime/thriller story, I’m surprised to find it’s the first in a series. I’m glad because I would very much like to know what happens next to the characters but I hope it’s a series with a strong story running through it rather than a series where the main character keeps throwing herself into trouble. It reminded me somewhat of Denise Mina‘s Garnethill trilogy which I read about a decade ago – well written and about people with big problems and damaged lives of one sort or another, but I’ll reserve judgement on that until I’ve read more.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a kindle eBook.

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

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I’ve had this audiobook on the go for a while, finally got around to finishing it off. When I get involved in an audiobook I end up with a big backlog of podcasts to listen to, with this one though I only listened to it when my podcasts were up to date. I’m not really sure what was wrong with it, maybe it was just the wrong way to absorb the book. I just didn’t enjoy it that much though I can’t really put my finger on why.

It’s narrated by Ernest Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley, they lived in Paris during the 1920s. I don’t know much about Hemingway but that didn’t seem like a good reason not to read the book, either beforehand or now. I like discovering new things in books, but this rather put me off and I got annoyed by the walk on cast of famous writers/artists who appear rather than interested in them. I think it would have been better if it had been the story of an anonymous couple in a way – the author has to lay down from the beginning that the marriage doesn’t last – something someone more familiar with the real life events than me would know. This foreshadowing didn’t work for me, I’d rather have watched the cracks appear without knowing that it ended badly.

Just a case of wrong story, wrong time I think.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.

Perfect by Rachel Joyce

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Wow, I completely loved this book. It starts out as a fairly ordinary seeming story about a couple of over-imaginative schoolboys in the early 1970s with much overuse of era-setting proper nouns; a typical breakfast dialogue: “Drink up your Sunquick.”, “Please could you pass me the Sugar Stars?”. And then it intertwines with the present day story of an older man who lives in an immovable campervan and works clearing tables wearing an orange hat in a supermarket café. And then somehow it all swims together and becomes greater than the sum of its parts. It grew on me a lot whilst I was reading, every twist in the story seemed to make it better. Both stories are carefully and sympathetically told and I didn’t want either strand to end for fear of bad things happening to the characters afterwards. A book that could quite possibly make you look at the world around you and the people in it in a whole new light, it has for me anyway.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a kindle eBook.