A Woman Unknown by Frances Brody

Cover of

I know I’m reading really slowly lately – this seemed to go on and on, but it looks as if it’s actually no longer than the first three books in the series. That sounds as if I didn’t like it, but I did, and I’m quite happy to spend more time with Kate Shackleton investigating in 1920s Yorkshire. There was plenty of plot to keep me going. One thing that annoyed me here, but also does in contemporary PI novels (VI Warshawski always seems to have the same failing) is how these characters keep going when no one seems to be going to pay them. It all works out in the end of course, and Kate is cleverly set up to be not-quite a lady of leisure so she can afford to stick her nose in wherever she likes. I thought a number of loose ends from the first few books were tied up nicely here and look forward to seeing what happens next.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a kindle eBook.

The Seven Sisters by Margaret Drabble

Cover of

I’m not quite sure why I have never read any of Margaret Drabble’s book before. I know I have an AS Byatt book around somewhere that I have never read either (Drabble and Byatt are sisters in case that sounds like a totally random comment). This turned up in an online recommendation based on the fact that I’d read lots of Penelope Lively’s books. I’m glad I took up the recommendation as I really enjoyed this and will be looking out for other Margaret Drabble books to read soon. This begins as the diary of a middle-aged divorcee and I had no idea where it was going to end up. I sort of expected it to have very little plot but it had plenty. A good find.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a kindle eBook.

Lost In The Forest by Sue Miller

Cover of

Not my favourite of Sue Miller’s books but not bad. It took a long time to get going but I think the build up worked. I don’t want to give away what the story ends up being about – it begins when Eva’s second husband John is killed and her family: John’s young son Theo, teenage daughters Emily and Daisy and their daughter’s father Mark begin to cope with this change in their lives. It’s set some time in the recent-ish past and I was pleased the author wrote one of those reunion style last chapters set a decade or so into the future so you could see how everyone moved on. They don’t always work but I thought it was an important part of the book here. Probably better than the three stars I have given it really.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a library book.