The Wyndham Case (Imogen Quy Mystery 1) by Jill Paton Walsh

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Jill Paton Walsh writes follow up books to the Dorothy L Sayers Peter Wimsey books. They always sound quite interesting but the one time I tried Dorothy L Sayers I couldn’t stand Wimsey, so I didn’t really want to read a follow up. But this is a book featuring characters of her own so I thought I’d try it. I’m not sure if that makes any sense really, but that’s how it was anyway!

This is a fairly old fashioned type of mystery even though it was written in the 1990s. Imogen Quy is the college nurse at St Agatha’s College, Cambridge and does some fairly gentle old fashioned type of investigating when a student is found dead on the floor of a locked library. It’s nothing ground breaking, it’s entertaining and I’ll probably read another in the series at some point.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a paperback.

Private Papers by Margaret Forster

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A good book, but didn’t engage me as much as other books by the same author have done. It’s basically a two hander, Rosemary is reading through her mother’s diary-cum-memoir and interjecting with her own views on events as Penelope relates the story of her life and family from her own point of view. Generally I like to see a story told from two different viewpoints neither of which can be relied on too much and I’m also quite happy to read about characters I don’t like or don’t find sympathetic. Although I liked the switching of the narration, and I alternately liked and disliked both the narrators I ended up disliking pretty much everyone in the book and not caring what happened to any of them. Ultimately I was happy to put it down and move on.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a paperback.

Cards on the Table (Hercule Poirot, #15) by Agatha Christie

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I enjoyed the Poirot I read recently and picked up another from the selection in the local library. This is classic Christie. She creates a field of suspects for a murder that is only four people wide, and then proceeds to show how they all have a motive, they all have opportunity etc. It’s all quite neat. In a way it’s very formulaic but that’s not a problem. It’s very entertaining having each suspect built up as the murderer and then played down again; and then there are four separate mysteries investigated as each suspect’s background is looked into. The ending piles layers of misdirection on top of each other – honestly, I already can’t remember who actually did it. It doesn’t really matter, it’s just fun to read.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
This was a library book.