Blood of the Isles by Bryan Sykes

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A fascinating book about the genetic history of the British Isles as seen through our mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes. The author spends a long time talking about our history as seen through fable, story and oral history, the kind of thing you might think was just pie in the sky made up by our ancestors to sound good (or bad as desired). I found these history lessons a little longwinded but it was enthralling when they were linked up with the evidence from our genes.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
Purchased on 25th July 2009.

Blood of the Isles: Exploring the Genetic Roots of Our Tribal History by Bryan Sykes

Cover of Blood of the Isles: Exploring the Genetic Roots of Our Tribal History

A fascinating book about the genetic history of the British Isles as seen through our mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes. The author spends a long time talking about our history as seen through fable, story and oral history, the kind of thing you might think was just pie in the sky made up by our ancestors to sound good (or bad as desired). I found these history lessons a little longwinded but it was enthralling when they were linked up with the evidence from our genes.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.

Freakonomics by Steven D Levitt

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Probably the most famous of the “lets explain the world using economics!” books which there may be a lot of around at the moment, or it may just be that I’ve noticed them in the last few years and they were moving below my radar before that. Not my favourite of the genre. Too many American examples (which is fair enough as the authors are Americans, just didn’t suit me this time) and too many things that seemed to concentrate on the sensational aspects. Didn’t find it well rounded I guess.

I’ll still probably take time to read the recently released follow up sometime though as it was interesting and well written and made me think even when I was disagreeing with it.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.
Purchased on 25th July 2009.

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (Freakonomics, #1) by Steven D. Levitt

Cover of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (Freakonomics, #1)

Probably the most famous of the “lets explain the world using economics!” books which there may be a lot of around at the moment, or it may just be that I’ve noticed them in the last few years and they were moving below my radar before that. Not my favourite of the genre. Too many American examples (which is fair enough as the authors are Americans, just didn’t suit me this time) and too many things that seemed to concentrate on the sensational aspects. Didn’t find it well rounded I guess.

I’ll still probably take time to read the recently released follow up sometime though as it was interesting and well written and made me think even when I was disagreeing with it.


More information about this book can be found on goodreads.